Washington Street Bridge
Fire Station
Federal Street Bridge
South Washington Street
New Town Square
Room 428

"There was a factory inspector who stopped at the Gilman a couple of years ago and he had a lot of unpleasant hints about the place. Seems they get a queer crowd there, for this fellow heard voices in other rooms--though most of 'em was empty--that gave him the shivers. It was foreign talk he thought, but he said the bad thing about it was the kind of voice that sometimes spoke. It sounded so unnatural--slopping like, he said--that he didn't dare undress and go to sleep. Just waited up and lit out the first thing in the morning. The talk went on most all night."

"Then we rolled into the large semicircular square across the river and drew up on the right-hand side in front of a tall, cupola crowned building with remnants of yellow paint and with a half-effaced sign proclaiming it to be the Gilman House."

"I was glad to get out of that bus, and at once proceeded to check my valise in the shabby hotel lobby. There was only one person in sight-- an elderly man without what I had come to call the 'Innsmouth look'..."

"...the sullen queer-looking night clerk told me I could have Room 428 on next the top floor--large, but without running water--for a dollar."

"Despite what I had heard of this hotel in Newburyport, I signed the register, paid my dollar, let the clerk take my valise, and followed that sour, solitary attendant up three creaking flights of stairs past dusty corridors which seemed wholly devoid of life. My room was a dismal rear one with two windows and bare, cheap furnishings, overlooked a dingy court-yard otherwise hemmed in by low, deserted brick blocks, and commanded a view of decrepit westward-stretching roofs with a marshy countryside beyond. At the end of the corridor was a bathroom--a discouraging relique with ancient marble bowl, tin tub, faint electric light, and musty wooded paneling around all the plumbing fixtures." -- The Shadow Over Innsmouth